Unicorns

Most people don’t believe in unicorns.

Some will simply never encounter a unicorn throughout their years on this earth, but most people will indeed come across one of these whimsical creatures and mistake her for a common plough horse. They will set her to work expecting docile servitude and fail utterly to tap into her strange, delicate gift. The unicorn is no beast of burden. She moves to the beat of the Wild and soon her capricious nature will draw her away.

The people who do recognise they’ve found a unicorn are the sweet, gentle souls that are a minority in this world. They see her for what she truly is and tentatively handle her to draw out her numinous talents. Their souls are nourished by her; that’s why she chose to enter their lives, to bestow her gift on the downcast deserving few.

Inevitably the unicorn will yearn to return to the Wild for she is as ephemeral as she is ethereal. The sweet, gentle soul might seek to corral her to keep her safe, to keep her gifts. The unicorn cannot be corralled. When she feels her offering has been received, when she feels the gentle soul can stand alone in this concrete world, the unicorn will fade away.

And the sweet, gentle soul will be left shattered and alone, forced to endure in a world a little less magical than before.

But I say this now to the sweet, gentle soul who has known a unicorn; better that she chose to reveal her unique and special self to you, for you are worthy. Better to have known the unicorn and lost her, than to have lived a life without her existence.

*Dedicated to someone who’s unicorn is about to return to the Wild.

5 thoughts on “Unicorns

  1. I can’t help but think of Last Unicorn, both the book by Peter Beagle, and the beautiful film by Rankin Bass. One scene in particular, where an ignorant farmer does make this mistake, and afterwards she reflects, “There may be other unicorns in the world, unknown, and glad of it.”

    Liked by 1 person

      1. With your affinity for unicorns. I think you’d love it. Among other things I was really impressed by how the author expressed the perspective of an immortal character like a unicorn, and the painful experience of experiencing doubt for the first time in such a long life. Just a beautiful story, a little bittersweet, but all the better for it.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. After you read the book I’d recommend looking up the Rankin Bass movie. It’s a classic from the 80s, though I’m a little biased.

        Like

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